B is for bone health

Bone loss accelerates during and after menopause for about five to seven years. It's vital to take care of your bone health in menopause.

Normal bone loss accelerates during and after menopause for about five to seven years. You can lose as much as 35 percent of your bone density during those few, short years…many people have weak bones and don’t even know it! Hormone imbalance, due to low levels of progesterone, over-acidic diet, nutrient deficiencies, smoking, excess alcohol, and sedentary behaviour are common osteoporosis risk factors. The good news is that there’s lots you can do. Healthy progesterone levels are vital and a healthy diet that includes calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K2, and magnesium, an organic progesterone cream and regular weight-bearing exercise also help to support bone health.

What is bone?

Bone is a living substance that contains blood vessels, nerves, and cells. There are two types of cells that control your bone structure:

▪ Osteoblasts – cells that build your bones

▪ Osteoclasts – cells that break down old or damaged bone to make room for new bone

Strong bones protect your heart, lungs, and brain from injury.

4 Steps to Help Protect Your Bones in Menopause

One of the best ways to achieve bone health in menopause (or any other time) is a diet rich in fresh, raw whole foods. In addition, you need healthy sun exposure along with regular, weight-bearing exercise:

  • Optimise your vitamin D3 either from natural sunlight exposure, a safe tanning bed or an oral vitamin D3 supplement. Check your blood levels regularly to make sure you’re within the optimal range.
  • Optimise your vitamin K1 through a combination of dietary sources (leafy green vegetables, fermented foods like natto, raw milk cheeses, etc.) and a K2 supplement, if needed.
  • Make sure you do weight-bearing exercises.
  • Consume a wide variety of fresh, local, organic whole foods, including vegetables, nuts, seeds, organic meats and eggs, and raw organic unpasteurised dairy for calcium and other nutrients. The more of your diet you consume RAW, the better nourished you will be. Minimise sugar and refined grains.

N.B. Osteoporosis Drugs

Contrary to what you’ve been told, most osteoporosis drugs actually weaken your bones. Bisphosphonate bone drugs impact your normal bone repair process by killing off your osteoclasts, and do make your bones denser, but because the osteoclasts are killed the bone is actually weaker as it is not remodelled properly.

AND REMEMBER!…it’s never too late to start! 

Osteoporosis: the emperor has no clothes

Osteoporosis is not an inevitable part of aging. There are many natural wways you can reduce your risk of fractures and improve your bone health

What if everything your doctor told you about osteoporosis and osteopenia was wrong?

Until recently, most of the medical fraternity believed that the reason older people fell was because their bones had become brittle and fractured more readily. An article in the Journal of Internal Medicine titled, “Osteoporosis: the emperor has no clothes,” confirms that the primary cause of what are normally labeled “osteoporotic fractures” are falls due more to lifestyle factors and not osteoporosis, i.e. abnormally “porous” or low-density bones.

The new study pointed out three false notions that can be disputed:

    1. Mistaken diagnoses:  Most fracture patients have fallen, but actually do not have osteoporosis. A high likelihood of falling is an age-related decline in physical health.
    2. Ineffective screening: Current fracture risk predictions including bone densitometry and other prediction tools can’t identify a large proportion of patients who will sustain a fracture, whereas many of those with a high fracture risk score will not sustain one.
    3. Unproven and unsafe treatment: The evidence for the success of prescribing drugs to prevent hip and other fractures is mainly limited to women aged 65–80 years with osteoporosis, whereas the proof of hip fracture-prevention in women over 80 and in men at all ages is virtually non-existent. Plus many drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis have also been associated with increased risks and serious side effects.

“While bone drugs like Fosamax  (a bisphosphonate) may contribute to increased bone mineral density, they do not necessarily improve bone quality and strength. Very dense bone created by destroying osteoclasts (bone-degrading cells) may be far more brittle than less dense bone where there is healthy turnover of the osteoclasts and osteoblasts (bone-building cells). In fact, drugs like Fosamax are notorious for contributing to bone degeneration in the jawbone. Plus an extensive body of research indicates higher-than-normal bone density greatly increases the risk of breast cancer.”


The authors conclude: “Given all this, should ‘osteoporosis’ be added to a long list of diagnoses for which doing less, or even nothing, is better than our contemporary practice?”

Fortunately, there are natural alternatives!

Eating a balanced diet of organic, unprocessed foods, using a natural bio-identical form of the hormone *Progesterone, doing regular weight-bearing exercises plus practices like yoga, Pilates, tai chi, walking etc., can help reduce the risk of fracture, and increase bone mineral density and strength.

*At ‘Your Natural Menopause’ we recommend a natural, organic progesterone cream called Naturone, available from their  website  www.naturone.com

Bone health in menopause

Bone loss accelerates during and after menopause for about five to seven years. It's vital to take care of your bone health in menopause.

Bone up on bone health

Normal bone loss accelerates during and after menopause for about five to seven years. You can lose as much as 35 percent of your bone density during those few, short years…many people have weak bones and don’t even know it! Hormone imbalance, due to low levels of progesterone, over-acidic diet, nutrient deficiencies, smoking, excess alcohol, and sedentary behaviour are common osteoporosis risk factors. The good news is that there’s lots you can do. Healthy progesterone levels are vital and a healthy diet that includes calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K2, and magnesium, an organic progesterone cream and regular weight-bearing exercise also help to support bone health.

 

What is bone?

 

Bone is a living substance that contains blood vessels, nerves, and cells. There are two types of cells that control your bone structure:

Osteoblasts – cells that build your bones

Osteoclasts – cells that break down old or damaged bone to make room for new bone

 

Strong bones protect your heart, lungs, and brain from injury.

 

4 Steps to Help Protect Your Bones in Menopause

 

One of the best ways to achieve bone health in menopause (or any other time) is a diet rich in fresh, raw whole foods. In addition, you need healthy sun exposure along with regular, weight-bearing exercise:

 

  • Optimise your vitamin D3 either from natural sunlight exposure, a safe tanning bed or an oral vitamin D3 supplement. Check your blood levels regularly to make sure you’re within the optimal range.
  • Optimise your vitamin K1 through a combination of dietary sources (leafy green vegetables, fermented foods like natto, raw milk cheeses, etc.) and a K2 supplement, if needed.
  • Make sure you do weight-bearing exercises.
  • Consume a wide variety of fresh, local, organic whole foods, including vegetables, nuts, seeds, organic meats and eggs, and raw organic unpasteurised dairy for calcium and other nutrients. The more of your diet you consume RAW, the better nourished you will be. Minimise sugar and refined grains.

 

N.B. Osteoporosis Drugs

Contrary to what you’ve been told, most osteoporosis drugs actually weaken your bones. Bisphosphonate bone drugs impact your normal bone repair process by killing off your osteoclasts, and do make your bones denser, but because the osteoclasts are killed the bone is actually weaker as it is not remodelled properly.

 

 

AND REMEMBER!…it’s never too late to start! 

 

Natural Progesterone for Menopause – Nature’s Magic Bullet

NATURAL PROGESTERONE Nature’s Magic Bullet for the problems of Menopause

NATURAL PROGESTERONE

Nature’s Magic Bullet for the problems of Menopause


PROGESTERONE
is the mother hormone from which all hormones are made, including oestrogen.Natural, bio-identical progesterone is the exact match to the progesterone your body manufactures and allows the body’s innate intelligence to manufacture exactly what hormones it needs. It is a non-invasive, natural way of dealing with imbalances that are caused primarily by our toxic environment with its hormone disrupting chemicals, and is a wonderful treatment to apply from peri-menopause through menopause and beyond. Oestrogen should always be in balance with its antagonist, progesterone, which is secreted in large amounts during ovulation.When ovulation ceases (peri-menopause) so do progesterone secretions. This results in serious “oestrogen dominance” with its symptoms of bloating, weight gain, high blood pressure, mood swings, allergies, low libido, migraines and memory problems.

Here are some examples of how progesterone helps restore the balance: 

  • It is a wonderful diuretic, helping to reduce oestrogen dominant weight gain and normalising blood pressure due to fluid retention.
  • It improves thyroid function.
  • It helps prevent osteoporosis. While oestrogen prevents bone breakdown, progesterone actually promotes bone rebuilding by stimulating the osteoblasts, the cells that create bone. 
  • Progesterone concentrations in the brain are up to 20 times higher than in the blood, so it has a soothing effect.
  • It decreases migraines caused by excessive oestrogen. 
  • It  promotes sleep 
  • It helps with with memory loss due to low hormone levels.
  • It improves libido

This therapy is a far safer, natural alternative to synthetic HRT. It does not just treat symptoms but gets to the underlying cause of the problems and brings the body back to balance promoting healing in all areas..

with thanks to Sally Longden




FAQS


Q: What is progesterone?
A: Progesterone is a steroid hormone made by the corpus luteum of the ovary at ovulation, and in smaller amounts by the adrenal glands. Progesterone is manufactured in the body from the steroid hormone pregnenolone, and is a precursor to most of the other steroid hormones.


Q: Why do women need progesterone?
A: Progesterone is needed by menopausal women for many reasons, but one of its most important roles is to balance or oppose the effects of oestrogen. Unopposed oestrogen creates a strong risk for breast and reproductive cancers. Progesterone also stimulates bone-building and thus helps protect against osteoporosis.


Q: What is bio-identical progesterone made from?
A:
The bio-identical progesterone used for hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) comes from plant fats and oils, usually a substance called diosgenin which is extracted from a very specific type of wild yam that grows in Mexico, or from soybeans. In the laboratory diosgenin is chemically synthesised into real human progesterone.

Q: How long before the benefits are felt?
A: The recommended course is at least 3 months, as this is how long it takes to bring your body into hormonal balance.


Q: Why not just use the progestins (HRT) as prescribed by most doctors?
A: Bio-identical progesterone is preferable to the synthetic progestins, because it is natural to the body and has no undesirable side effects when used as directed. If you have any doubts about how different progesterone is from the progestins, remember that the placenta produces 300-400 mg of progesterone daily during the last few months of pregnancy, so we know that such levels are safe for the developing baby. But progestins, even at fractions of this dose, can cause birth defects, and many other side effects, including partial loss of vision, breast cancer in test dogs, an increased risk of strokes, fluid retention, migraine headaches, asthma, cardiac irregularities and depression.


Q: What is oestrogen dominance?
A: Oestrogen dominance occurs when the normal  balance of oestrogen to progesterone is changed by excess oestrogen or inadequate progesterone. Oestrogen is a potent and potentially dangerous hormone when not balanced by adequate progesterone. Women who have suffered from PMS and menopausal hormone imbalances, will recognise the hallmark symptoms of oestrogen dominance: weight gain, bloating, mood swings, irritability, tender breasts, headaches, fatigue, depression, hypoglycaemia, uterine fibroids, endometriosis, and fibrocystic breasts. Oestrogen dominance is known to cause and/or contribute to cancer of the breast, ovary, endometrium (uterus).


Q: Why would a premenopausal woman need progesterone cream?
A: In the ten to fifteen years before menopause, many women have anovulatory cycles (when no egg is released by the ovary) in which they make enough oestrogen to create menstruation, but not enough progesterone, thus setting the stage for oestrogen dominance. Using progesterone cream during anovulatory months can help prevent the symptoms of PMS.


Q: How safe is progesterone cream?
A: A one-time overdose of the cream is virtually impossible. During the third trimester of pregnancy, the placenta produces about 300 mg of progesterone daily!


References:
John R. Lee, M.D.

What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause: The Breakthrough Book on Natural Progesterone, (Warner Books, 1996)

What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Pre menopause: Balance Your Hormones and Life from Thirty to Fifty  (Warner Books, 1999)

WILD YAM

Bio-identical progesterone  comes from plant fats and oils, usually a substance called diosgenin. One source is a very specific type of wild yam that grows in Mexico.

GOOD NEWS!

Your Guru has found a source of a natural progesterone cream!
For details on how to order this cream go to
menopausematters.guru 



I’d love to hear from you! 
Any questions, or if you have a story you’d like to share,
email me at:
info@menopausematters.guru

Beware the silent thief! How to “lock up” your bone health

Here’s something that every woman needs to know: 

Your normal bone loss accelerates during and after menopause for about five to seven years before returning to the slightly slower rate that men experience.

You can lose as much as 35 percent of your bone density during those few, short years…many people have weak bones and don’t even know it!




bones-1Beware the Silent Thief!

Taking good care of your bones, starting from an early age, involves three major steps:

1. AWARENESS of the “Silent Thief” – If not given the right kind of care, bones can begin to weaken early in life. It’s a quiet, symptom-less process that steals away your bones. You can’t feel it happening, at least not in the early stages – hence the name “silent thief”.

2. PHYSICAL activity and the proper exercises – for increasing or maintaining bone and muscle mass, balance, and coordination.

3. DIETARY changes to improve your bone health, including clearing up some of the myths surrounding supplements and nutrients.


bones-2What is bone?


Bone is a living substance that contains blood vessels, nerves, and cells.

There are two types of cells that control your bone structure:

  • Osteoblasts – cells that build your bones
  • Osteoclasts – cells that break down old or damaged bone to make room for new bone

Osteoblasts produce a protein called osteocalcin that strengthens your skeleton.Very simply, as long as the bone-forming activity, called absorption, is greater than bone breakdown, called resorption, you’re pretty much assured of maintaining healthy bones. Strong bones protect your heart, lungs, and brain from injury, and your bones become a warehouse for important minerals that you need throughout your life.



Osteoporosis Drugs

Contrary to what you’ve been told, most osteoporosis drugs actually weaken your bones. Bisphosphonate bone drugs impact your normal bone repair process by killing off your osteoclasts, and do make your bones denser, but because the osteoclasts are killed the bone is actually weaker as it is not remodelled properly.


Do’s & Don’ts

Hormone imbalance, mainly due to low levels of progesterone, over-acidic diet, nutrient deficiencies, smoking, drinking excess alcohol, and sedentary behaviour are common osteoporosis risk factors.. The good news is that there’s lots you can do. Healthy progesterone levels are vital, but this is  huge subject and will be the main  topic of the next newsletter. A healthy diet that includes calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K2, and magnesium, regular weight-bearing exercise, and hyaluronic acid may also help to support bone health.

  • Sesame seeds (1/4 cup) 351 mg
  • Sardines, canned in oil with bones (3 ounces) 324 mg
  • Yogurt (unsweetened) (1 cup) 300 mg
  • Goat’s milk (1 cup) 326 mg
  • Swiss cheese (1 ounce) 270 mg
  • Spinach (1 cup cooked) 260 mg
  • Cabbage/Broccoli (1 cup cooked) 226 mg
  • Canned salmon with bones (3 ounces) 181 mg  

NB. Some high calcium foods also contain naturally high amounts of vitamin K2, such as fermented cheeses and butter from grass-fed cows. When choosing dairy, look for products made from raw, hormone-free, unpasteurised milk:


AND REMEMBER!…it’s never too late to start! 


P.S. Feeling hormonal? Why not download my free guide to hormone imbalances. Click Here

P.P.S. Any queries, ideas or if you would just like to say Hi, email me at info@menopausematters.guru