Endometriosis..a silent enemy

menopause survey results

Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a hormonal and immune system disease where tissue similar to that inside the uterus grows in other areas of the body. It is undetectable unless seen through laparoscopy, and is unlikely to develop after the onset of menopause. In peri menopause it is triggered by the oestrogen oestrodial, which diminishes after menopause.

Endometriosis most commonly occurs between the uterus and the rectum, where its presence can cause painful intercourse, rectal pressure, and pain with bowel movements, especially before a period; symptoms are pelvic pain and inter-menstrual spotting.

You may be one of the many women with endometriosis who looks forward to reaching menopause – the time when your hormones change and your period stops; your doctor may have told you that it “dies out” after menopause. The good news is that this seems true for some women although research on endometriosis and menopause is very limited. You may find that menopause brings relief from the pain you’ve experienced during your cycle or with sexual activity, and other symptoms may also ease up.

However, women with advanced stage endometriosis can often have long-term pain associated with the damage that endometriosis caused before menopause. Since it is a disease that affects the digestive and immune systems, as well as the reproductive system, you may find that you still experience problems or even develop new problems with your bowels or with your immune system, like asthma or allergies. While endometriosis symptoms vary a great deal from woman to woman, the classic symptoms of endometriosis are pelvic pain, abnormal menses, and infertility. A woman with advanced endometriosis may experience no symptoms and be unaware she has it, whereas another with minimal endometriosis may experience debilitating pelvic pain and cramps almost continuously. Most women with endometriosis fall somewhere in-between these extremes.

WHAT TO DO?

Natural progesterone is the best way to combat the effect, and it is best applied as a cream. A whole foods diet high in fibre that avoids trans fats can also provide dramatic relief from symptoms of endometriosis. Many women have had remarkable pain relief from simply stopping consumption of dairy foods, eggs and red meats.Be sure to eat one to two servings daily of organic, cruciferous vegetables, such as kale, collard greens, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage, and turnips, and also avoid caffeine. Supplementing the diet with a good source of essential fatty acids and a multivitamin–mineral supplement rich in B complex, zinc, selenium, vitamin E, and magnesium can also help.