How not to get caught short by the HRT shortage

If you’re in the UK you have probably heard in the news recently that there is a national shortage of hormone replacement therapy due to manufacturing delays.  The appearance of symptoms is due to hormone imbalance at perimenopause in your 40s and 50s. We encourage a natural approach to menopause and managing hormone balance with diet, exercise, avoidance of toxins containing xeno-oestrogens and the use of bio-identical hormone replacement therapy.

What can you do if the HRT shortage affects you?

We encourage you to try alternatives to HRT.  

Diet

A healthy diet can really help to balance your hormones. You can read more about what we recommend diet wise here. In the mean time stick to fresh, unprocessed foods, organic where possible. Sugar should be cut to a minimum or eliminated altogether if you can. Alcohol and caffeine can exacerbate hot flushes, so reduce their intake too.

Exercise

Feel better and protect yourself from osteoporosis by with  regular weight bearing exercise. Exercise also stimulates the production of endorphins so you’ll feel better emotionally too.  There are many menopause symptoms which can be alleviated by yoga and you can find how yoga can help you here.

Avoidance of toxins

Xeno-oestrogens are hormone disruptors which have occurred as a result of industrialization. Xeno-oestrogens mimics oestrogen in the body leading to oestrogen dominance which causes hormone imbalance. They can be found in all sorts of products such as cosmetics, cleaning products, plastics. Our article 10 signs of oestrogen dominance and what you can do about it tells you more about toxins and how to avoid them.

Natural progesterone cream

Natural progesterone or bioidentical hormone replacement therapy is, for us, the gold standard in hormone balancing for easing symptoms of menopause You can read more here  When buying a natural progesterone cream it is essential to ensure that the cream you buy has the correct amount of the active ingredient. At Menopause Matters Guru we have teamed up with our preferred supplier of the cream and you can find out more by emailing us at info@menopausematters.guru

Osteoporosis: the emperor has no clothes

Osteoporosis is not an inevitable part of aging. There are many natural wways you can reduce your risk of fractures and improve your bone health

What if everything your doctor told you about osteoporosis and osteopenia was wrong?

Until recently, most of the medical fraternity believed that the reason older people fell was because their bones had become brittle and fractured more readily. An article in the Journal of Internal Medicine titled, “Osteoporosis: the emperor has no clothes,” confirms that the primary cause of what are normally labeled “osteoporotic fractures” are falls due more to lifestyle factors and not osteoporosis, i.e. abnormally “porous” or low-density bones.

The new study pointed out three false notions that can be disputed:

    1. Mistaken diagnoses:  Most fracture patients have fallen, but actually do not have osteoporosis. A high likelihood of falling is an age-related decline in physical health.
    2. Ineffective screening: Current fracture risk predictions including bone densitometry and other prediction tools can’t identify a large proportion of patients who will sustain a fracture, whereas many of those with a high fracture risk score will not sustain one.
    3. Unproven and unsafe treatment: The evidence for the success of prescribing drugs to prevent hip and other fractures is mainly limited to women aged 65–80 years with osteoporosis, whereas the proof of hip fracture-prevention in women over 80 and in men at all ages is virtually non-existent. Plus many drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis have also been associated with increased risks and serious side effects.

“While bone drugs like Fosamax  (a bisphosphonate) may contribute to increased bone mineral density, they do not necessarily improve bone quality and strength. Very dense bone created by destroying osteoclasts (bone-degrading cells) may be far more brittle than less dense bone where there is healthy turnover of the osteoclasts and osteoblasts (bone-building cells). In fact, drugs like Fosamax are notorious for contributing to bone degeneration in the jawbone. Plus an extensive body of research indicates higher-than-normal bone density greatly increases the risk of breast cancer.”


The authors conclude: “Given all this, should ‘osteoporosis’ be added to a long list of diagnoses for which doing less, or even nothing, is better than our contemporary practice?”

Fortunately, there are natural alternatives!

Eating a balanced diet of organic, unprocessed foods, using a natural bio-identical form of the hormone *Progesterone, doing regular weight-bearing exercises plus practices like yoga, Pilates, tai chi, walking etc., can help reduce the risk of fracture, and increase bone mineral density and strength.

*At ‘Your Natural Menopause’ we recommend a natural, organic progesterone cream called Naturone, available from their  website  www.naturone.com

Natural Ways to Relieve Hot Flushes

Natural remedies for hot flushes

Hot flushes (or flashes) and night sweats are a very well known symptom of menopause. They happen when blood vessels close to the skin dilate to cool. The sudden feeling of heat appears from nowhere and  seems to spread through your body. They can appear at any time and if they turn up at night for you, are known as night sweats. A flush can cause redness, sweating and sometimes palpitations. The incidence and severity, like all menopause symptoms, varies from woman to woman.

Hot flushes are often inconvenient and uncomfortable but there are plenty of natural ways you can try to reduce them.

Keep a diary of your hot flushes and see if there are any patterns or you notice any triggers. These may be caffeine, hot and spicy foods, alcohol or stress. Smoking may also trigger hot flushes.

Lifestyle

Cut down on caffeine and hot spicy foods.

Wear clothes and choose bedsheets that wick away sweat, particularly those night sweats which leave you feeling cold and clammy afterwards. For natural fabrics try bamboo yarn which is naturally wicking. Avoid cotton as the moisture stays close to your skin.

Keep your rooms cool and sleep with a window open if possible

If you are a smoker then giving up the habit will benefit you in more ways than just hot flushes.

Other remedies

Meditation, yoga and breathing exercises all help reduce the stress that can be a trigger for hot flushes. Try a minute of slow deep breathing. 6-15  breaths per minute is ideal

Red clover provides a rich source of isoflavones (water soluble chemicals which act like oestrogen – known as phytoestrogens). It is available in tablet form, tea bags and dried flowers which can be taken as an infusion

Black cohosh used by native Americans for many years since it was discovered it can help reduce menstrual cramps and menopause symptoms

Sage has been used for medicinal purposes since ancient times. Sage tea has may uses not least of which is to reduce hot flushes and menopausal sweats. Sage is also available in tablet form.

Evening primrose oil  has many benefits for menopausal women including lessening the effects of hot flushes

Natural progesterone cream. I am a huge fan of this and know from experience that it is extremely effective in getting rid of hot flushes