Peri Menopause. What’s it all about?

Healthy diet in peri-menopause and menopause

It is only relatively recently that science has been able to break down the female experience they simply called ‘change of life’ and give each stage of it a name, like ‘peri menopause’, ‘menopause’ and ‘post menopause’.

‘Peri menopause’ is the first stage and the one it is vital to understand and crack right at the beginning. It is when the body begins to prepare itself for a time when child bearing is over and no longer the focus of the body biology. 

This usually happens in a woman’s 40s and is generally a fairly measured process, a gradual build-up to the time when the menstruation cycle ceases completely. Peri menopause is signalled by a dropping off in progesterone production. Progesterone is such a critical hormone in females that when its production slows down or ceases , much trouble can be expected. That’s because normal health requires a hormonal balance between progesterone and its opposite, oestrogen. Take one away and the other becomes dominant.

Symptoms of peri menopause

Here are some of the ‘symptoms’ that are signs of progesterone decline:

  • Anxiety 
  • tearfulness 
  • weight gain (or loss)
  • lowering libido 
  • night sweats
  • increased menstrual cramping
  • cracked and dry skin, amongst others

These uncomfortable symptoms are because the body is trying to adjust to the relative oestrogen excess.

Oestrogen and progesterone are what are known as the ‘sex hormones’. But when they are unbalanced, it affects other hormones too. For example, cortisol levels may increase and insulin resistance can become more common. 

All these hormones are synthesised in the body using nutrients absorbed in the digestive process, so it is absolutely vital at this potentially unbalancing time to eat a healthy, balanced diet.

Another word of explanation! Before menopause the ovaries are the main source of oestrogen manufacture, but as they become less active the balance shifts. Eventually at least half of the body’s oestrogen and progesterone is made in the adrenal glands. 

At times of stress the adrenal glands will always prioritise the secretion of the stress hormones over the creation of sex hormones – that’s their prime function, you see. Stress therefore is a key factor in keeping your body hormonally balanced from your 40s onward. The body, meanwhile, can also seek oestrogen from other sources – like the fat cells which store it – once the ovaries start to slow down. Of course this may explain why some women put on weight at this time – the body craves more oestrogen which translates as more food. 

Oestrogen dominance, particularly during peri menopause, is the cause of decreased sex drive, irregular or absent periods, bloating, swollen and tender breasts, not to mention depression and irritability, wild mood swings, cold hands and feet, weight gain, and headaches.

  How to manage peri menopause

Eat a healthy balanced diet, avoiding refined carbohydrates such as pasta, bread, cake and biscuits. Choose fresh, organic vegetables, grass fed beef, free range, organic chicken and non farmed fish, plus pulses and whole grains instead.

Try to cut out the use of stimulants like caffeine and alcohol, but don’t be too hard on yourself. Don’t make yourself miserable!

And keep yourself busy! Exercise not only keeps your mind off your problems, it is good for you! Include things like regular reflexology or massage treatments, daily meditation, better time management. And spend time in the great outdoors, getting back in touch with nature, and even keeping track of your actions and thoughts!

K is for Kundalini

In times gone by, menopause was seen as a natural part of life. Then in the 1960s, with the expanding of the drug industry, menopause began to be treated as an illness, needing HRT and/or tranquillisers. As well as weight gain and hot flushes, women worried about losing their femininity, youth, vitality and libido.But looked at in a different way, it can be a whole new and exciting experience

Some healers have explored the connection between menopause and kundalini. Kundalini is energy that rests in the body. It is thought that when women allow it, kundalini can be awakened during menopause. The word is Sanskrit for “serpent-power” and it is useful to picture this energy as a coiled snake or as energy that is sleeping. It rests at the base of the spine, waiting for us to awaken it and use its great potential. Perhaps a better way to think of it is as a heightened sense of awareness and consciousness.

Some yogis and healers believe that menopause hot flushes are actually releases of kundalini energy being guided up the spine. Just think of them as “power surges!” 

We can become aware on a new level. As kundalini ascends, it passes through each of our energy centres, so we may feel some physical side effects such as headaches, heart palpitations, indigestion, etc. Often, menopause symptoms simply disappear over time. To make the most of this transformation, try to spend some time alone in a natural setting every week. Sit in the park with your back against a tree. Walk barefoot in the sand at the beach. Hike a trail in the mountains to watch the sunrise. Or listen to peaceful music and allow your feelings and thoughts to flow. If you’re having trouble sleeping, allow yourself to take catnaps during the day, and remember, you’re at an age now where you don’t care what other people think! Relax and allow what is happening to flow through you.

The average menopausal woman is not an ancient crone! There are safe, natural ways ways to relieve the symptoms. We can view menopause as an opportunity to achieve something that only comes with age – maturity and wisdom. These days women can live active healthy lives well into their eighties and beyond, and look forward to new and exciting and opportunities.

7 Ways Magnesium Rescues Hormones

One of the doctors we admire is Dr. Lara Briden. Her approach is a natural one, and she prescribes magnesium for almost every hormonal condition, including PCOS, thyroid, hair loss, PMS, migraines, and peri-menopause.

“I love magnesium because it makes people feel better almost immediately. What’s up with this mineral? Why are we all so deficient? We’re deficient because our cells dump magnesium during stress. We actively push it out of our bodies as a way to rev up our nervous system”

Why magnesium is good for hormones

  1. Regulates cortisol. It calms your nervous system and prevents excessive cortisol. Your stress hormonal system—also called your hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis—is your central hormonal system. When it functions well, then your other hormones (thyroid and reproductive hormones) will function well too.
  2. Reduces blood sugar and normalises insulin. It’s effective at improving insulin sensitivity. Healthy insulin sensitivity means fewer sugar cravings and is effective treatment for weight loss and PCOS.
  3. Supports thyroid. Magnesium is essential for the production of thyroid hormone. It is also anti-inflammatory, which helps to quiet the autoimmune inflammation that underlies most thyroid disease.
  4. Aids sleep. Magnesium is the “great sleep-promoter,” and sleep is crucial for hormone production. Sleep is when we should enjoy a beneficial surge of anabolic hormones such as DHEA and growth hormone.
  5. Fuels cellular energy. It’s so intricately involved with mitochondria and energy production, that we can safely say: “Without magnesium, there is no cellular energy”. Hormonal tissue has a high metabolic rate, and so requires even more cellular energy and more magnesium than other tissue.
  6. Supports a healthy hormone response. It aids in the manufacture of steroid hormones including progesterone, oestrogen, and testosterone. It also normalises the action of progesterone on the central nervous system, which could be why it relieves symptoms of PMDD, migraines, and menopause.
  7. Activates vitamin D, and slows ageing. Without enough magnesium, vitamin D cannot do its job. Plus it slows ageing as it prevents telomere shortening, and reduces oxidative stress.

Should you test for magnesium deficiency? The answer is no. As the majority is inside your cells, there no accurate way to measure it with a blood test. You simply have to try a supplement and see how you feel.

Magnesium supplements

The best supplement is magnesium glycinate or bisglycinate (the mineral joined to the amino acid glycine). This is the least laxative supplement, and also the most absorbable. Food sources of magnesium include leafy greens, almonds, chocolate, and mineral water.

For a special treat, try magnesium and resveratrol rich chocolate!

Ingredients

Combine all ingredients – you may need to soften coconut oil if it is solid. Pour into chocolate moulds or a lined baking tray and allow to set in the fridge.

Get creative and add your favourite flavours to tantalise your taste buds.
Try a dash of vanilla; pinch of sea salt; nut butters; goji berries; raspberries, orange peel; pistachios; flaked almonds. The possibilities are endless!

Enjoy the guilt free pleasure!

Toxic fingertips!

It’s very difficult to find good, healthy cosmetics. Words like “organic” and “natural” are not well-regulated and are often misleading, with numerous “natural” products containing toxic substances. For a start, toxic substances are often included in nail polish. Here’s how to spot them, and avoid them in the first place.

The toxic trio

If you look at the label of any nail polish, you’ll see a swarm of chemicals, such as butyl acetate, heptane, and dimethyl adipate. While most of these are completely harmless, some are not so benign.

The so-called toxic trio of nail polish consists of dibutyl phthalate (a plasticizer), toluene (to evenly suspend color), and formaldehyde (a known carcinogen that is used as a hardening agent). The toxicity of these substances is still debated, but there is significant evidence to raise big question marks. Let’s take them one by one:

  • Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP) is a commonly used plasticizer — it makes products more flexible. According to the EPA, this chemical appears to have relatively low acute (short-term) and chronic (long-term) toxicity. No human studies have been published, so almost all of the information we have on them comes from animal studies. The effects aren’t severe, but short term exposure has been linked to nausea and irritated eyes, skin, nose, mouth, and throat. There were also reports indicating that DBP might have damaging effects on the reproductive system —  especially in males.
  • Toluene is a paint thinner. It’s a colourless, water-insoluble liquid often used in common glue. It’s the ingredient sniffed as a recreational inhalant in “glue sniffing!” Toluene toxicity has been studied much more than that of DBP and has been associated with dizziness, numbness, dry skin, and irritated nose, eyes and throat. Liquid toluene is much more dangerous than its vapour, and some people can be more sensitive to it than others. Levels of up to 200 parts per million (ppm) are considered acceptable, and nail polish generally has much lower levels than this. The mechanism by which toluene produces systemic toxicity is not known, but the effects are generally short-termed.
  • Formaldehyde is frequently used in a variety of products although it can pose a significant danger to human health. It is a common precursor to more complex compounds and materials used in many industrial branches. Low levels of formaldehyde occur naturally in a variety of foods, such as fruits, but those levels aren’t dangerous. In America the FDA, which oversees the cosmetics industry, does not prohibit or regulate the use of formaldehyde in cosmetics, except in nail polish, since it can be toxic. The problem is in the quantity, as nail hardeners include formaldehyde concentrations of up to 5%, while nail polish can go up to 0.5%, which is quite high.

Other health concerns with nail polish

Health advocates have campaigned against these substances for over a decade, but there are other chemicals that are also of concern. A study conducted by researchers from the Duke University and Environmental Working Group suggests that a chemical called triphenyl phosphate, or TPHP, is used in many types of nail polish.

This is a hormone-disrupting chemical, which is quite disturbing, but the study made another worrying find: the substance gets absorbed into the body every time nail polish is used.

“It is very troubling that nail polish being marketed to women and teenage girls contains a suspected endocrine disruptor,” said study co-author Johanna Congleton, Ph.D., MSPH, a senior scientist at EWG. “It is even more troubling to learn that their bodies absorb this chemical relatively quickly after they apply a coat of polish.”

Ironically, we get really annoyed when these substances are present in the materials around us, but for some reason, we’re more tolerant with what we put on ourselves.

“People get really upset about phthalates in plastics, but they don’t think about what’s in the cosmetics they’re applying directly to their skin,” study co-author Kate Hoffman, a researcher at Duke University, told Yahoo News . “The skin is an organ that takes it all in.”

The thing is, these substances are sometimes not written on the label at all, or even if they are written, their effects are often not mentioned. They’re surrounded by numerous other benign chemicals and more often than not, the user is completely unaware of the potential toxicity carried by cosmetics.

Does this mean we should stop using nail polish?

Absolutely not. It’s important to remember that the dose makes the poison, so the occasional use should pose no risk. If you use nail polish all the time or if you work in a cosmetic salon, however, you may be at significant risk. Ensure that ventilation is adequate in the salon or room, and take care of your cuticles to minimise contact between polish and skin.

Also, try to stay informed and avoid products with potentially toxic compounds. However, this can be quite difficult because due to the lack of strict regulation, labels are often misleading. You can use Skin Deep, the Environmental Working Group searchable cosmetics database to look for “safer” polishes – water-based nail polish is generally much safer and eco-friendly.

You can have beautiful nails and stay safe, it’s completely possible. Nail polish has been around for thousands of years, and it’s here to stay, so we just have to make it healthier.

Who said that? – feeling invisible as you get older and what to do about it.

We hear so many women over 45 saying they have noticed that they appear to have become invisible, either at work, to the opposite sex or just in general life.  No need for Harry  Potter’s invisibility cloak, age has done the job for you!

Sometimes that suits us just fine as we don’t seek to gain a lot of attention from our actions. However the flip side of that is that it might make you feel under valued, unappreciated, sad or annoyed. Combine the invisibility affect with the mood swings that some women are affected by during perimenopause and you could end up literally in a hot mess.

So what’s a woman to do?

Challenge yourself: Change something. Take on a new and exciting challenge. If you’ve ever fancied trekking across the Andes on a llama, now’s the time to do it. Of course you don’t have to go to extremes. Simply changing the sorts of clothes you wear can be a challenge for some women.

Seek out attention, and not in a negative way by screaming, shouting and becoming a drama queen. Make an effort to strike up conversations with new people – you never know who you’re going to meet. Think up some new conversation openers that will lead to interesting and varied interactions.

Decide what you want and the best way to get noticed. Make a plan and go for it. If it all feels a bit uncomfortable or too much of a leap then taking small incremental steps will get you there – it may be a bit slower but if you get on the path and keep going you’ll get there.  If you remember the film Finding Nemo – just keep swimming.

Grow your confidence. Feeling invisible can lead to a lack of confidence and you owe it to yourself to build yours up. Start by adopting an assertive posture, stand up straight and smile. Think positive thoughts. Repeat affirmations to yourself out loud and regularly. Banish negative thoughts. Take notice of the thoughts you have and  whether they are negative or positive. When you think a negative thought, become aware of it and ask yourself how you could turn it into a plus.

Think of positive role models for older women. Many women in the public eye  have spoken recently about their menopause and how they have overcome and problems. Learn from them and ape their successes. Some of our favourites are Joanna Lumley and Helen Mirren.

Get support from like minded women and share how you overcome the challenge of being unseen. Our Facebook group is a great place to start. Feel free to join us there for support and a great place to share your triumphs and tribulations. Here’s the link

HRT raises breast cancer risk for years!

Vitamin D is vital for good health but did you know it plays a role in protecting you from cancer. WE discuss the link between vitamin d and breast cancer

An analysis of dozens of studies found that women taking the therapy remain at a higher risk for more than a decade after stopping use

A sweeping new analysis adds to the evidence that many women who take hormone therapy during menopause are more likely to develop breast cancer—and remain at higher risk of cancer for more than a decade after they stop taking the drugs.

The study, published recently in the Lancet, looked at data from dozens of studies, including long-term data on more than 100,000 women who developed breast cancer after menopause. Half of those women had used hormone therapy, or HRT. The longer women took the medicine, the more likely they were to develop breast cancer. Experts say the findings could shape how women and their health care providers decide how to manage symptoms of menopause.

“This is a consensus of many researchers and many studies all around the world. These are important new results,” said said Valerie Beral, a cancer epidemiologist at the University of Oxford and one of the lead authors of the new study.

Women have long been prescribed synthetic versions to replace the hormones that decline during menopause. The medications—usually delivered in a pill, but sometimes in a patch, gel, or injection—provide women either estrogen or a combination of estrogen and progestogen, a synthetic form of progesterone. For some women, they may help to tamp down symptoms of menopause.

For years, research has suggested a potential link between HRT and an increased risk of breast cancer. In 2002 and 2004, the Women’s Health Initiative released reports that showed women who used combination HRT were more likely to develop breast cancer. HRT use fell after the reports received widespread coverage. That was followed by a decline in breast cancer rates.

But there wasn’t much information on whether that risk persisted, or how it differed based on the type of HRT a woman took. So an international group of researchers pulled together data from dozens of studies—published and unpublished—to examine the issue more closely. They took a woman’s age at first use of HRT, how long she used the medication, and the time elapsed since she last used it into account. The mean age of women starting menopause was 50, which was also the mean age at which women started using HRT.

The researchers found that compared with women who never used HRT, women who did had a significantly higher risk of developing invasive breast cancer. They estimated that 6.3% of women who never used HRT developed breast cancer, compared to 8.3% of women who used the combination drug continually for five years. That’s roughly one extra cancer diagnosis for every 50 users.

The longer women used HRT, the greater their risk of breast cancer. Women who were no longer using HRT had a lower relative risk than women who were currently using it—but they remained at an elevated risk for more than a decade after they stopped taking the drug. The level of risk was dependent on how long a woman took HRT. The study also found that women who took the combination drug were more likely to develop cancer than women who took the estrogen-only drug.

“The findings are significant,” said Joanne Kotsopoulos, a breast cancer researcher at Women’s College Research Institute in Toronto. “The longer you use it, the higher the risk,” added Kotsopoulos, who wasn’t involved in the research but wrote a commentary on the study, also published in the Lancet. “It’s a balance. Every woman is different, but the risk is high for breast cancer, so they need to take a very serious approach.”

How not to get caught short by the HRT shortage

If you’re in the UK you have probably heard in the news recently that there is a national shortage of hormone replacement therapy due to manufacturing delays.  The appearance of symptoms is due to hormone imbalance at perimenopause in your 40s and 50s. We encourage a natural approach to menopause and managing hormone balance with diet, exercise, avoidance of toxins containing xeno-oestrogens and the use of bio-identical hormone replacement therapy.

What can you do if the HRT shortage affects you?

We encourage you to try alternatives to HRT.  

Diet

A healthy diet can really help to balance your hormones. You can read more about what we recommend diet wise here. In the mean time stick to fresh, unprocessed foods, organic where possible. Sugar should be cut to a minimum or eliminated altogether if you can. Alcohol and caffeine can exacerbate hot flushes, so reduce their intake too.

Exercise

Feel better and protect yourself from osteoporosis by with  regular weight bearing exercise. Exercise also stimulates the production of endorphins so you’ll feel better emotionally too.  There are many menopause symptoms which can be alleviated by yoga and you can find how yoga can help you here.

Avoidance of toxins

Xeno-oestrogens are hormone disruptors which have occurred as a result of industrialization. Xeno-oestrogens mimics oestrogen in the body leading to oestrogen dominance which causes hormone imbalance. They can be found in all sorts of products such as cosmetics, cleaning products, plastics. Our article 10 signs of oestrogen dominance and what you can do about it tells you more about toxins and how to avoid them.

Natural progesterone cream

Natural progesterone or bioidentical hormone replacement therapy is, for us, the gold standard in hormone balancing for easing symptoms of menopause You can read more here  When buying a natural progesterone cream it is essential to ensure that the cream you buy has the correct amount of the active ingredient. At Menopause Matters Guru we have teamed up with our preferred supplier of the cream and you can find out more by emailing us at info@menopausematters.guru

PREGNANT AT 50! Eeek!

There’s been much in the news lately about how doctors can delay menopause for up to 20 years. One procedure has just become available at a clinic in Birmingham. Doctors at the ProFam (short for Protecting Fertility and Menopause) are able to remove a piece of ovary via keyhole surgery, freeze it and then re-implant it when a woman’s natural menopause occurs.The implanted tissue then produces hormones that reverse the menopause. These grafts can maintain a woman’s youthful hormone production for years.

This procedure has been used before to help young cancer patients who have gone into premature menopause because of chemotherapy, who want to recover their fertility. Now it is being offered to more women who can pay to have their ovarian tissue removed up to the age of 40 and stored for use when they reach menopause. The average age for women to reach menopause is 51. The hormonal changes can affect quality of life and cause adverse effects such as strokes, heart disease, osteoarthritis, not to mention hot flushes, depression, mood swings and memory loss.

So whilst this breakthrough procedure to delay menopause could enable women to have babies into their 50s, it could also benefit women whose menopause triggered health issues and who were reluctant to use HRT because of harmful side effects. Women who did not want to become pregnant could have the ovarian tissue re-implanted anywhere with a strong blood supply, such as the armpit.

Children born in the West today can reasonably expect to live up to 100, so for the first time women will be living for as long after menopause as before it. Medical procedures like these can help women to break free from the constraints of their biology, by calling time on their biological clock.

J is for Juggling!

The Sandwich Generation is a generation of people (usually in their 40’s to 70’s) who care for their ageing parents while supporting their own children; including young adults aged 25 -34, who are staying or returning home in increasing numbers!

Keeping all those balls in the air can be a major problem! A Carers’ UK report in 2012 said that approximately 2.4 million people  aged 40 to 70 are both raising a child and caring for a parent. 

That in itself is stressful, but look at that age group! It is almost precisely the time that women are starting to feel the effects of peri and menopause!

A number of strategies are needed to cope with this situation so that you don’t become overwhelmed.

As with any big goal or change there are lots of actions you can take to reach your goal and it’s best to break them down into small steps. There are lots of changes we recommend. You don’t have to do them all at once. Pick one you like the look of and practice it until you are comfortable with the change you have made, then add another to your repertoire. Make the changes gradually until you feel less stressed.

  1. Make yourself some head space. Take a break and practice meditation. Start with 5 minutes at a time and if you find your mind wandering, focus on your breath. There are several meditation apps. Two of our favourites are One Minute Meditation (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6eFFCi12v8) and Headspace (https://www.headspace.com/headspace-meditation-app)

2.       Exercise. The benefit of exercise to reduce anxiety and also menopausal symptoms cannot be underrated as it helps correct hormone imbalance which is the root of symptoms. Another advantage of exercise is that it results in lower levels of heart failure in post menopausal women. You can read more here.

3.       Manage your mindset. If you expect your menopause to be stressful and difficult then it probably will be. It is important to maintain a positive outlook. There are lots of ways to achieve this. One of our favourites is  use of affirmations. You  can find lots on our Instagram feed

4.       Reduce toxins. This can be the confusing one as we are absolutely  surrounded by toxic substances which disrupt hormones. Industrialisation has been great in so many ways and we as a society have benefitted lots. However many man made materials, cosmetics, household cleaners and products contain toxins which contribute to oestrogen dominance which in turn exacerbates menopause symptoms You can read more about oestrogen dominance in our article here. A great rule of thumb is to use items which are as close to their natural state as possible.

5.       Get good sleep. It’s so much easier to deal with anything if you have had a decent night’s sleep and are full of energy. Go easy on the late nights, and all night parties. Get into good bed time habits and avoid too much stimulation before sleep (sorry that includes your mobile phone)

6.       Eat a good balanced diet. Avoid processed foods and sugar. Focus on plenty of fresh produce like organic meats and fish, fruit and vegetables. Cut down on alcohol – you don’t have to ban it altogether.

7.       Balance your hormones. We advocate the use of natural progesterone cream and our favourite one is made by a company called Naturone, as it’s important to ensure you have the correct percentage of progesterone in the cream  To try it follow the link and quote MENOPAUSE MATTERS in the order information

Menopause. Is it a modern myth?

Menopause. Is it a modern myth?

We’re always interested in finding different explanations of menopause, and even more to hear your opinions.

Helen has recently visited a homotoxicologist , a biomedical  therapy based on homeopathy who recommended a book Medical Medium by Anthony William.  The book contains chapters on various conditions and offers explanations for them.  As you can imagine we were fascinated to read his theory of menopause.  

William notes that throughout history menopause has been viewed positively. The medical literature contains few references to menopause particularly in a detrimental way. This all changed around the 1950s. Women born from 1900 on were the first to experience the symptoms we now associate with menopause, hot flushes, mood swings, depression etc. He also noted that men suffer the same symptoms around that age, weight gain, depression forgetfulness and ‘work sweats’.

“Physicians reported the epidemic to pharmaceutical companies and at first the consensus was that it was all in women’s heads – it was just crazy woman syndrome. They had to be making up their symptoms because otherwise it made no sense. It was all a cry for attention, a sign they were bored. Women were told to join the PTA” (WTF?!)

So what changed between 1900-1950 to make menopause the monster it is seen as today? Williams proposes a number of factors which attribute all the blame to menopause when the symptoms are the result of a variety of causes

Epstein Barr Virus

EBV was taking root in the early 1900s. the theory here is that it entered the womens bodies and spends decades building up to the inflammatory condition which causes symptoms and coincides with the onset of perimenopause.

Radiation exposure

Most women of the time were exposed to huge amounts of radiation just through buying shoes. From the 1920s-50s each shoe shop and department contained an ingenious foot measuring device called a fluoroscope. This amazing machine took an x-ray of the foot bones to enable shoe sales people to get an accurate picture of your foot and therefore find and sell the best fitting shoes. The dose of radiation delivered each time was unmeasured and unregulated. Luckily by the 1950s the dangers of radiation had been discovered and the fluoroscope was removed from service. Many women had legs amputated and suffered from related cancers around this time and all were attributed to the menopause rather than the real culprit.

DDT exposure

In the 1940s and 50s DDT was seen as a wonder pesticide. Little was known about the incredible harm it did due to its toxicity. Use of DDT peaked in the 1950s and the central nervous system and liver were overloaded with the toxin.

Williams states that menopause was used as a scapegoat for a variety of reasons and it does not make sense that something which had previous caused no problems should suddenly be the root cause of all the symptoms of menopause.

Now it’s quite possible that these theories do explain some exacerbation in symptoms in women. However, there are other possibilities. Since the turn of the last century there has been a huge increase in the manufacturing industry. We use more artificial chemicals than ever before in cleaning products, cosmetics and industrially. The xeno-oestrogens found in these have a severe effect on hormone and hormone balance. You can read more about oestrogen dominance in our article 10 Signs of Oestrogen Dominance and What You Can Do About It.

What do you think?  What other explanations for menopause and its symptoms have you heard? We’d love to hear  your views. Feel free to comment on this blog. fffff