BE AWARE! It’s Breast cancer month!

October is national Breast Cancer Awareness Month and National Mammography Day is the third Friday of October, which this year was on the 19th.

There are many reminders that mammograms save lives, but little effort is made to educate women about actual prevention. Detecting cancer has nothing to do with prevention, and at this point, it’s already too late. Many doctors now say that mammograms have serious health risks which are ignored by conventional breast awareness campaigns.

Importantly, vitamin D optimisation could potentially eliminate a vast majority of breast cancers, yet this key information is being completely ignored!

Research shows most cancers occur in people with a vitamin D blood level between 10 and 40 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL), and the optimal level for cancer protection has been identified as being between 60 and 80 ng/mL. Once you reach a minimum serum vitamin D level of 40 ng/mL, your risk for cancer diminishes by 67 percent, compared to having a level of 20 ng/ml or less. Vitamin D also increases your chances of surviving cancer if you do get it, and evidence suggests adding vitamin D to the conventional treatment for cancer can boost the effectiveness of the treatment.

Just last month, research published in the journal Menopause found that postmenopausal women who receive a diagnosis of breast cancer are more likely to be vitamin D deficient and overweight than women who receive a negative diagnosis. Overall, breast cancer patients were one and a half  times more likely to have low vitamin D.

This year, do your breast health a real favour and get your vitamin D level checked.

The best way is through sensible sun exposure, but many of us will need oral supplementation, especially in the dark days of winter!

Just remember that if you take high-dose oral vitamin D, you may also need to increase your intake of calcium, magnesium and vitamin K2 as well, as these four nutrients work together, and rely on sufficient amounts of each to work properly. Low levels of vitamin K2 in combination with high vitamin D intake may cause over absorption of calcium, which in turn can result in calcium deposits in your heart and kidneys.

Calcium-to-magnesium is also important, as magnesium helps keep calcium in your cells so they can function better, a ratio of 1-to-1 appears to be ideal.

Magnesium is also required for the activation of vitamin D, as without sufficient magnesium, taking a vitamin D supplement may be ineffective, making it appear you need unnecessarily high amounts. If your magnesium level is too low, the vitamin D will simply get stored in its inactive form, doing you absolutely no good.

If you’ve been taking a certain amount of vitamin D3 for a number of months and re-testing reveals you’re still not within the recommended range, then you know you need to increase your dosage. Over time, with continued testing, you’ll find your individual sweet spot and have a good idea of how much you need to take to maintain a healthy level year-round.